No es necesario ningún dispositivo Kindle. Descárgate una de las apps de Kindle gratuitas para comenzar a leer libros Kindle en tu smartphone, tablet u ordenador.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Obtén la app gratuita:

Precio Kindle: EUR 7,99

Ahorra EUR 4,35 (35%)

IVA incluido (si corresponde)

Estas promociones se aplicarán a este artículo:

Algunas promociones pueden combinarse; otras no. Para más detalles, revisa los términos y condiciones de cada promoción.

Enviar a mi Kindle o a otro dispositivo

Enviar a mi Kindle o a otro dispositivo

Volver atrás Ir adelante
Narración Audible Reproduciendo... Interrumpido   Estás escuchando una muestra de la narración Audible para este libro Kindle.
Más información

Call The Midwife: A True Story Of The East End In The 1950s Versión Kindle

4.3 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 3 opiniones de clientes

Ver los formatos y ediciones Ocultar otros formatos y ediciones
Precio Amazon
Nuevo desde Usado desde
Versión Kindle
"Vuelva a intentarlo"
EUR 7,99
Tapa dura
"Vuelva a intentarlo"
EUR 28,76 EUR 0,79
Tapa blanda
"Vuelva a intentarlo"
EUR 2,36 EUR 0,79
Casete de audio, Audiolibro
"Vuelva a intentarlo"

Longitud: 354 páginas Word Wise: Activado Tipografía mejorada: Activado
Idioma: Inglés

Kindle Unlimited
Lee más de 1 millón de eBooks en cualquier dispositivo Kindle o en la aplicación gratuita Kindle. Pruébalo gratis durante 30 días

Descripción del producto

Críticas

Re-released to tie in with a new BBC adaptation, you must read this superbly moving but also witty story. (CLOSER)

This is a funny, at times disturbing, memoir of a world that has now changed beyond measure. (HUDDERSFIELD DAILY EXAMINER)

A poignant, funny and enlightening book (Charlotte Vowden DAILY EXPRESS)

If you loved the TV adaptation, why not read the original books of Jennifer Worth's stories of being a midwife in London in the '50s? The characters you will meet, both colleagues and patients, stay with you for a long time (WOMAN)

Descripción del producto

A fascinating slice of social history - Jennifer Worth's tales of being a midwife in 1950s London, now a major BBC TV series.

Jennifer Worth came from a sheltered background when she became a midwife in the Docklands in the 1950s. The conditions in which many women gave birth just half a century ago were horrifying, not only because of their grimly impoverished surroundings, but also because of what they were expected to endure. But while Jennifer witnessed brutality and tragedy, she also met with amazing kindness and understanding, tempered by a great deal of Cockney humour. She also earned the confidences of some whose lives were truly stranger, more poignant and more terrifying than could ever be recounted in fiction.

Attached to an order of nuns who had been working in the slums since the 1870s, Jennifer tells the story not only of the women she treated, but also of the community of nuns (including one who was accused of stealing jewels from Hatton Garden) and the camaraderie of the midwives with whom she trained. Funny, disturbing and incredibly moving, Jennifer's stories bring to life the colourful world of the East End in the 1950s.


Detalles del producto

  • Formato: Versión Kindle
  • Tamaño del archivo: 1621 KB
  • Longitud de impresión: 354
  • Editor: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (14 de mayo de 2009)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • ASIN: B002UP1SX6
  • Texto a voz: No activado
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Activado
  • Tipografía mejorada: Activado
  • Valoración media de los clientes: 4.3 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 3 opiniones de clientes
  • Clasificación en los más vendidos de Amazon: n°53.536 Pagados en Tienda Kindle (Ver el Top 100 de pago en Tienda Kindle)
  •  ¿Quieres informarnos sobre un precio más bajo?


¿Qué otros productos compran los clientes tras ver este producto?

Opiniones de clientes

4.3 de un máximo de 5 estrellas
5 estrellas
2
4 estrellas
0
3 estrellas
1
2 estrellas
0
1 estrellas
0
Ver las 3 opiniones de clientes
Comparte tu opinión con otros clientes

Principales opiniones de clientes

Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
I loved this book. It brilliantly describes people's lives and their struggles in certain areas of London after WW II. It is also a good compilation of stories telling us how midwives managed almost the impossible. Very well written. I have enjoyed every page of it.
¿Esta opinión te ha parecido útil? No Enviando comentario...
Gracias por tu opinión.
Lo sentimos, no hemos podido registrar tu voto. Vuelva a intentarlo
Informar de un abuso
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
una lectura amena, que te engancha desde el principio, aunque hay algún capítulo muy triste que cuesta más leer. en general lo recomendaría.
¿Esta opinión te ha parecido útil? No Enviando comentario...
Gracias por tu opinión.
Lo sentimos, no hemos podido registrar tu voto. Vuelva a intentarlo
Informar de un abuso
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
Recibido correctamente y es lo esperado aunque no he tenido tiempo de leerlo hasta ahora, solo he podido ojearlo por encima.
0 de 3 han opinado que lo encuentran útil. ¿Esta opinión te ha parecido útil? No Enviando comentario...
Gracias por tu opinión.
Lo sentimos, no hemos podido registrar tu voto. Vuelva a intentarlo
Informar de un abuso

Opiniones de clientes más útiles en Amazon.com (beta)

117 de 120 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
HASH(0x9fe21c3c) de un máximo de 5 estrellas You won't regret picking this book up! It'll be hard to put down. 4 de mayo de 2009
Por Story Circle Book Reviews - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda
"Why did I ever start? Do I regret it?" Jennifer Worth asks herself in her memoir The Midwife. "Never, never, never. I wouldn't swap my job for anything on earth." Worth began her career as a midwife in the 1950s in the London Docklands.

The Docklands were poverty stricken, dirty, and recently bombed during World War II. People lived in condemned buildings among rats, grime, and violence. Worth worked out of a Nunnery, providing prenatal care, delivering babies in their homes, and checking up on the moms and babies afterward. It was a busy life with highly unpredictable hours.

One of the most memorable women in the book was Conchita Warren. Worth delivered two of her babies, numbers 24 and 25! The Warren family all lived together in a small London apartment. What was most remarkable--apart from the vast number of children--was the fact that Conchita spoke no English. Her soldier husband had met and married her in Spain and brought her home with him. "Quite suddenly, with blinding insight, the secret of their blissful marriage was revealed to me," Worth wrote. "She couldn't speak a word of English, and he couldn't speak a word of Spanish!"

Some readers may be turned off by the subject, fearing gore, blood, and other unpleasant things often associated with birth. But this is one book you don't want to judge by its cover. The Midwife is, more than anything, the story of an amazing woman in 1950s London and the people she met. I recommend this book to anyone interested in history, motivating stories, or who just wants a good read.

by Jennifer Melville
for Story Circle Book Reviews
reviewing books by, for, and about women
110 de 116 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
HASH(0x9fe21a68) de un máximo de 5 estrellas Touching Tale 13 de julio de 2009
Por Julie Peterson - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda
When I first heard about the book THE MIDWIFE: A Memoir of Birth, Joy, and Hard Times by Jennifer Worth, I just knew I wanted to read it. I have always been fascinated by the role of midwives in our history, and I thought the idea of the author living in a convent would be interesting. too While I was thinking that I'd probably like this book, I can definitely say that THE MIDWIFE far exceeded my expectations!

This is a major aside, but it might help explain my interest in the profession of midwifery. I think women who choose midwives for their birthing option have amazing experiences. However, I have to admit that I didn't choose to go that route -- mainly because I am a major chicken and wanted an epidural. (In fact, when I was admitted to the hospital to deliver my first daughter and was asked about my pain plan, I told them DRUGS - early and often.) I find it very ironic that my daughter was actually delivered by a midwife because the doctor never made it to the delivery room in time! My husband and I agreed that the woman who delivered my daughter was a very supportive and inspirational person who made my delivery extra-special.

Since THE MIDWIFE is a memoir, I was expecting it to be all about the author Jennifer Worth. I figured that this book would include information about how the author became a midwife -- the reason behind her decision as well as lots of information on her training, etc. However, much to my surprise, this book wasn't really all about Ms. Worth. Rather, the "memoir" was filled with amazing stories about the mothers (and others) that she encountered during her years as a midwife. In addition, I was surprise by how readable this book was -- there were so many touching stories as well as humorous ones that existed within the pages of this book.

I just loved reading this book and learning about all of her patients' birthing stories. I definitely gained a huge respect for the value of a midwife in the lives of these people who lived in London's East End in the 1950s; however, what I also found was how brave and strong all of these women were who lived back then. Often times, these women were living in squalid and crowded conditions with lots (and lots) of children; and their husbands were little, if any, help. In addition, birth control wasn't really an option for most of these women. The way they balanced their lives and their families is absolutely amazing; and I found THE MIDWIFE to be a very uplifting story about the power of women!

In addition to enjoying the stories about Ms. Worth's patients, I also really liked the parts of the book that took place in the convent. Because the author had worked as a nurse in the rigid environment of a hospital, she definitely appreciated the loving and caring nature of the nuns. I have no doubt that these nuns were just wonderful women with all the good they did for the families in London's East End. While I was touched by their actions, I also found myself laughing out load at the many hilarious stories about the women. I felt like these anecdotes about the women living in the convent were also very much a testament to the strength of women.

Another thing I really adored about this book was seeing how Ms. Worth grew not only as a midwife, but also as a person. I really liked her from the first pages of this book; however, my admiration for her just kept growing as I read this book. I truly believe that women that went into the midwife profession in the 1950s like Ms. Worth were a very special breed, but I loved how Ms. Worth matured through the years she lived in the convent. She began her story with a pretty apathetic view on religion; however, as she lived with these holy women and saw their faith, she began to think about her own beliefs. The book definitely doesn't hit you over the head with these messages (and maybe I was just looking for them), but I really appreciated how she ended this book.

Needless to say, I highly recommend THE MIDWIFE. I think anyone who is interested in midwifery or even medicine back in the 1950s would enjoy this book. In addition, I think women of all types will value the various stories about the amazing women she encountered.
105 de 115 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
HASH(0x9e8d84b0) de un máximo de 5 estrellas A rare treasure 6 de septiembre de 2008
Por Amazon Customer - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda Compra verificada
I picked up this book in the London airport on a whim: I was pregnant and it took place in London-- a perfect souvenir. I was immediately drawn into this young midwife's story of her experiences in the poor areas of London during the 1950s. Since she wrote her memoir years later, the insight of an older woman adds a deeper layer to the book that really makes it a treasure. I lent this to my mother upon returning from our trip and haven't seen it since-- it's one of those rare books that will be passed around until it's well worn.
38 de 40 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
HASH(0xa2386a08) de un máximo de 5 estrellas A Well-told Tale. Five Stars! 27 de agosto de 2009
Por James Denny - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda
Jennifer Worth's tale of her time as a midwife in the Docklands of London's East End in the 1950's reads more like a Dickensian novel from the 1850's. She explains that by the early 1960's, the East-ender Cockney culture and dockworker-dominated economy in this part of London came quietly to an end. This culture had sustained itself for more than 100 years with little change, highly insulated from outside influences.

"The Midwife: A Memoir of Birth, Joy and Hard Times" is more than a tale of delivering babies. It is a work of history and anthropology as well as a personal memoir. The chapter-by-chapter blend of all these elements is told by a woman with a keen eye to all that she saw and experienced. No detail escapes her sharp eye. Each chapter is a story unto itself. The chapters roll up to an epic tale.

Why did this culture end in the early 1960's? Worth offers up three reasons for this: loss of dockyard jobs; demolition of the tenements; and arrival of the pill resulting in much smaller family size.

Huge families were still the norm in the Docklands of the East End in the 1950's as they had been for many decades. Families typically lived in two or three-room tenements, some without running water and most without a bathroom. No one practiced birth control. Young people married young.

Many of the tenement blocks were built in the 1840's and 1850's. Those that survived World War II bombing had undergone little structural alteration in the years since. This type of living would support a modest working-class family that allowed a measure of dignity in an era still largely missing the social support systems and welfare in Britain today.

With rudimentary nursing skills, Worth affiliated with a church order that provided midwifery services to the women in families who embraced this culture. At the time, most working-class women still gave birth at home rather than in hospital. The midwives performed essential services to people who would otherwise have gone largely without. Most of their skills were learned by experience and mentoring not through academic or technical medical education.

Her tale is also about what life was like at the nunnery and why she enjoyed the lifestyle and companionship more than as a nurse in a hospital. As a bonus, at the end of the book there is a fascinating appendix on Cockney language terms and expressions, their derivation and use.

"The Midwife" is a well-told tale of a bygone era. Five Stars!
59 de 67 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
HASH(0x9e8d3570) de un máximo de 5 estrellas I Can't Believe I'm Saying This... 20 de abril de 2013
Por B. Milan - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda Compra verificada
Like many reviewers, I first became aware of these books through the public television series. It was so engaging and interesting, I knew the book(s) would be great. (Dare I say it, I hoped for the lyricism of Vanessa Redgrave's narratives.) After watching the first season, I could hardly wait to get my hands on all three books. Well. For what I think might be a first for me (and I can't believe I am actually saying this), I'm recommending that you stick with the tv show.
The books aren't bad--they just aren't very good. They give a lot of sociological/historical background, but much of it is rather academically written, full of statistics and devoid of personality. I wanted stories of the midwives, their lives, and most of all interesting stories of the area residents. To be honest, the books do include this, but except for a very few isolated exceptions the writing doesn't spring to life.
The second book in the series, Shadow of the Workhouse, has little to do with the midwifes and concentrates on other residents. It's a mildly interesting treatise on the lingering affects of workhouses, but again not at all what I expected. If you want to learn about the work and experiences of midwives, I recommend you skip this middle volume.
Throughout, Jennifer Worth writes primarily of her own personal experiences and says very, very little about the other midwives with whom she lived and who shared the work with her. The producers of the television series greatly improved the story by taking some of those experiences and putting them into the hands of other characters.
I read online that Jennifer Worth wrote this book after hearing or seeing an article (can't remember which) where the statement was made that what the midcentury former midwives needed was "a James Herriot to tell their stories." Well, what can I say. Jennifer Worth is no James Herriot--not even close--and we are still waiting.