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Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Book 3)
 
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Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Book 3) [Versión Kindle]

J.K. Rowling
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas  Ver todas las opiniones (3 opiniones de clientes)

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Descripción del producto

Descripción del producto

Harry Potter, along with his best friends, Ron and Hermione, is about to start his third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Harry can't wait to get back to school after the summer holidays (who wouldn't if they lived with the horrible Dursleys?). But when Harry gets to Hogwarts, the atmosphere is tense. There's an escaped mass murderer on the loose, and the sinister prison guards of Azkaban have been called in to guard the school.

Detalles del producto

  • Formato: Versión Kindle
  • Tamaño del archivo: 1277 KB
  • Longitud de impresión: 435
  • Uso simultáneo de dispositivos: Hasta 100 dispositivos simultáneos según los límites del editor
  • Editor: Pottermore Limited (27 de marzo de 2012)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • ASIN: B00728DYQ0
  • Texto a voz: Activado
  • X-Ray:
  • Valoración media de los clientes: 5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas  Ver todas las opiniones (3 opiniones de clientes)

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5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas
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Las opiniones de cliente más útiles
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Excelente elección 26 de mayo de 2014
Formato:Tapa blanda|Compra verificada
Ya había leído los libros sexto (Príncipe mestizo) y séptimo (Reliquias) de Harry Potter en inglés, por lo que tenía cierta tranquilidad sobre lo que podía esperar.

Sin embargo, el libro ha supuesto una experiencia aún mejor de lo que esperaba.
¿Esta opinión te ha parecido útil?
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Libro genial para tus hijos, encuadernacion sencilla pero a un precio inmejorable. 15 de diciembre de 2013
Por Rafael
Formato:Tapa blanda|Compra verificada
Para un español que quiera libros en ingles sin encuadernaciones especiales pero a un precio excelente es lo mejor del mercado.. Yo compro muchos para mi hijo, que puedo decir mejor que eso
¿Esta opinión te ha parecido útil?
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Harry potter y el prisionero de azkaban 2 de noviembre de 2013
Por Yolanda
Formato:Tapa dura|Compra verificada
El libro me llegó en perfecto estado, tal y como yo esperaba, y sin apenas tener que esperar! Y a un precio increíble!
¿Esta opinión te ha parecido útil?
Opiniones de clientes más útiles en Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 de un máximo de 5 estrellas  9.051 opiniones
943 de 1.044 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas A stunning and thoroughly satisfying conclusion 21 de julio de 2007
Por Jonathan Appleseed - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Tapa dura
This is arguably the most "hyped" book in history, and if J.K. Rowling had to sneak down to the kitchen for a glass of red wine to calm her nerves while writing The Goblet of Fire (as she said she did), one wonders what assuaged her while writing Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The collective breath of tens of millions of readers has been held for two years...and now...was it worth the wait? Did Ms. Rowling live up to the hype? (For that, amongst hundreds of questions, is really the only question that matters.)

The answer, most assuredly, is YES.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is told in a strikingly different style than the previous six books - even different from The Half Blood Prince, and, I daresay, it's a better written, better edited, tighter narrative. And while the action is lively and well paced throughout, Rowling found a way to answer most of our questions while introducing new and complex ideas. What fascinated me was this: Some people were right, with regard to who is good, who is bad, who will live, who will die - but almost nobody got the "why" part correct. I truthfully expected an exciting but rather predictable ending, but instead was thrown for a loop. We've known that Rowling is fiendishly clever for years - but I didn't think she was *this* clever.

Not since turning the final page of The Return of the King twenty-eight years ago have I felt such a keen sense of loss. My love affair (indeed, everyone's love affair, I imagine) with all things Harry began somewhere in the first three chapters of The Sorcerer's Stone, and has lasted, on this side of the Atlantic, three months shy of nine years. For all that time we have waited and wondered - was Dumbledore right to trust Snape? Will Ron and Hermione get together? What's to become of Ginny and Harry? What really happened on that tower, when Dumbledore was blasted backwards, that "blast" atypical of the Avada Kedavra curse as we've seen it when used throughout the series. So many more questions than those listed here, and so many devilishly well-hidden hints. The answers, as I hinted above, will shock and awe you.

When first we met Harry Potter, he was "The Boy Who Lived", with an address of "The Cupboard Under the Stairs". Who could help but bleed sympathy for Harry, treated abysmally - abused, really - by the only blood relatives he had, and forced to live under said stairs by those awful Muggles, the Dursleys? It was a sensationally brilliant introduction, one that ensured that our heartstrings would be plucked and enchanted to sing. He was The Boy Who Lived.

Since reading that first book, we have enjoyed Rowling's spry sense of humor - portraits that spoke, stairways that moved at any given moment, Hagrid jinxing Dudley so that a pigs tail grew from his behind, Fred and George's fantastic creations, etc, etc., etc., and more etc's. There was a sense of wonder and magic in Rowling's writing, so thoroughly captivating that the recommended age group of 9-12 in no way resembled the book's actual audience. It was common to see adults walking about with hardcover copies of the latest book, sans dust jacket (to hide the fact that they were reading a "kids" book, I suppose). It was also common to hear of eight year olds sitting down with a seven-hundred-plus page book! By themselves! If I hadn't seen it with my own eyes, I wouldn't have believed it.

As for Harry, we admired him. He wasn't afraid to stand up for what he felt was right, even if he found himself in detention for it. He was brutally honest, and immensely courageous and loyal. Harry came to embody, at times, who we would like to be. He wasn't perfect, of course. He suspected Snape of being the one who was after the Sorcerer's Stone, and in The Chamber of Secrets, he thought that Malfoy was the heir of Slytherin. This didn't diminish Harry in our eyes - it made him more human, more real, and even, perhaps, more enviable.

Endless fan sites have been erected. For an adult to go to any of them, and find that thirteen year olds are having an easier time parsing out the books plots, subplots, and mysteries, was (for me at least) humbling, but yet also a testament to Rowling herself, and her remarkable creation. She encouraged an entire generation of young readers to read and to think for themselves.

But the time has come to say good-bye, for this is truly the end.

So good-bye, Harry. Good-bye Hermione, Ron, Professor Dumbledore, *Professor* Snape, Professor McGonagall, Professor Hagrid, Ginny, Fred, George, Neville, Dobby (and all the house elves), even Lord Voldemort and his Death Eaters. We will miss all of you, every character we encountered, from Muggle to Mudblood to hippogriff and owl, and everything about the world you all so vibrantly inhabit. And to Ms. Rowling: know that you have brought immeasurable joy to millions and millions of Muggles worldwide, and know that we cannot possibly thank you enough. What a tremendous gift you were given. Thank you for sharing it with us.
112 de 125 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas One of my favorite books, 2nd best of the Potter books 17 de octubre de 2007
Por Mike London - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Tapa dura
For my money, though I like the first two Potter books, this is where Rowling struck gold. I started reading the series in late 1999 or early 2000, well before GOBLET came out, and when I finished the three books that at that time were out, I thought AZKABAN was not only easily the best of three, but one of the best books I had read in a long time. The storyline is easily the strongest of the first three installments, and for once Voldemort is not the main villain driving the plot, but, so it is thought, a renegade supporter of his who murdered 13 people with a single curse.

In AZKABAN, we learn an escaped criminal from the wizard prison Azkaban by the name of Sirius Black is out on the lam looking for Potter. Black was once a vehement supporter for Voldemort, and now Black is gunning to finish off the job by murdering Potter, a task he had tried to do several years ago. Not only that, Potter learns during the course of the plot that Black was James' best friend, along with the new defense against the dark arts teacher, Remus Lupin. We get to learn who Scabbers really is (another instant of an character mentioned in passing on the first two novels who is hugely important here). Black is Potter's godfather, and yet he betrayed the Potters!

What makes Azkaban so interesting is you really get to learn about the relationships between James Potter, Remus Lupin, Sirius Black, Peter Pettigrew, and Severus Snape. These five characters, and their relationships with one another, are huge portions of the foundation on which Rowling built her series. You need a clear understanding of these characters to fully experience Rowling's series, and it is thru these characters that this book, and the series itself, is as rich as it is. The fact no one knew that the three characters were unregistered animagus to help Remus cope with his condition was pretty cool.

For once, Rowling introduces a new magical artifiact called the Marauder's Map, which she uncharacteristically fully explains by the end of the novel. It was made by Padfoot, Moony, Wormtail, and Prongs, which are the nicknames of James and his crew. The map shows you the location of every one on the Hogwarts grounds, a tremendously useful item, supplied, appropriately enough, by those masters of mischief, Fred and George.

Another great new bit of magic in the book is the Patronus, a magical spell that will help fight back the dementors and fear, a very advanced piece of magic for third years. It is also very touching to know why Harry's patronus is a stag, as that is what his father transformed into.

There are also other memorable scenes and events. You get Hermione and the Time Turners, Buckbeak the Hippogriff, Professor Trelawney, the Dementors, the Maurader's Map, etc. The climax of the novel is great, but for me, it's that time when Remus, Sirus, Harry, Hermione, Ron, and Snape are all in that Shreiking Shack, and you finally get to learn a lot of key information about Harry's past.

Ironically enough, though I have long held the opinion this is the best Potter book of them all (not including Book 7), this book has the worst movie adaptation, BECAUSE they don't fully establish all the different relationships between the four, or even explain the Marauder's Map.

For myself, this is easily my favorite of the Potter novels, or was until DEATHLY HALLOWS came out. Still, I have had a great history with this book, and probably reread this more than all the other Potter books. This is the second best Potter book.

These are my order of Potter books by preference:
Deathly Hallows
Prisoner of Azkaban
Order of the Phoenix
Philosopher's Stone/Chamber of Secrets (I rank them both the same)
Half-Blood Prince
Goblet of Fire.
120 de 135 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas For those of us that grew up with Harry... 23 de julio de 2007
Por Chelsea - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Tapa dura
*SPOILERS: please don't read if you haven't finished the book*
After reading the seventh and final installment of the Harry Potter series, as well as many of these reviews, I simply cannot believe that anyone would rate this book with less than 5 stars. I have read reviews where people say that the ending is too "light and fluffy", or that "Harry should have died", and that the whole deathly hallows part of the plot is pointless because, in the end, Harry does not keep the hallows. Can no-one here see why JK Rowling ended the series as she did? I grew up with Harry Potter, the first book having been released when I was about 9 or 10. I cannot express how depressing it would have been had Harry died, for(forgive me for the cheeziness) if Harry had died surely there was no hope for the rest of us. Furthermore, the ending is not "light and fluffy". Harry overcomes Voldemort as his character develops, as he finally understands how to finish the Dark Lord once and for all- as he allows himself to be sacrificed for the benefit of "the greater good". The deathly hallows merely stand as the temptation for Harry to become all-powerful, to make the same mistake that Voldemort and Dumbledore(when he was young) made. His choice to turn down the opportunity to evade death not only speaks on his true character, but sets him apart from those who would try to harness this power. Even if Harry had chosen to keep the Hallows for good purposes, would he not eventually turn into the same type of tyrant as Grindelwald, as Voldemort, and as Dumbledore would have become? Yes, the hallows did appear and disappear in this one book, but because Harry chose NOT to keep them for himself, he chose the path of the pure-hearted. By this action, we truly see how much Harry has grown and matured. We also see just how different Harry really is from Voldemort, a question Harry himself had been wondering for some time.

So for those of you that bash this book for not ending in total destruction, and claim that "life is not fair and evil really does win", please remember that life is only what you make of it. Only those of us who grew up with Harry can really say just how much his life means to us, and I would just like to thank JK Rowling for this wonderful finishing piece of the Harry Potter series.
211 de 242 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas I'm 23 and I've read it twice 13 de junio de 2000
Por yarden - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Tapa dura
In anticipation of Harry Potter, Book 4, I had to read the first three books again. What I was struck with, again, is the sheer imaginative nature of J.K. Rowling's books. Simply put, these books are instant classics.
"Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" is the third in the series following Harry Potter at Hogwart's school of wizardry. Harry is now a 13-year old (his birthday occurring at the beginning of the book), and concerned mostly with classes, Quidditch (a wizard sport), and the fact that he's not allowed to visit the local wizard village of Hogsmeade with his friends on the weekends. One of the reasons for this is that Sirius Black, a convicted murderer, has broken out of Azkaban, the wizard prison, and word has it that he's out to get Harry.
In keeping with Harry Potter tradition, the reader can expect surprises, twists and turns, malicious rivals, uncommonly kind professors, terrible relatives, amazing magic candy, true friendships, and a whiz-bang ending.
It's delightful to see how Rowling can stay true to the feel of the previous books, and yet allow Harry and friends to mature. This book is a little longer than the previous books, but the imagination never lets up, and gradually Harry's world is widening.
I would recommend this book to ANYONE (any age) who enjoys the writings of Roald Dahl, C.S. Lewis, Madeleine L'Engle, or J.R.R. Tolkien. This is a very fun, humourous, and enjoyable fantasy novel, and one that should be read more than once!
37 de 39 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas As if you care what a 15 year old thinks of this book 2 de julio de 2001
Por S. Kwong - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Tapa dura
In pure honesty, I will be astounded if anybody actually reads my review, but in case you actually would like my prognosis of this novel, read on.
Before I begin, though, if you are a new reader who has never read any of the Harry Potter series, I would strongly recommend reading them in order. An avid fan, I have read all of the current ones several times, but I'm reviewing "The Prisoner of Azkaban" for the reason it is my favorite. Although "Goblet of Fire" (4) is undeniably deeper and well-written, I personally favor this one so far.
For me, the first two books of this series served merely as an introduction into the wonderful world of Harry Potter. They allow the readers to begin to expand their mind enough to absorb the pure imagination in this magnificent fantasy. Again, that is why I urge new readers to read the first two before delving into this one. Grammatically, it is no more difficult to read than the first two. Content wise, however, J.K. Rowling goes all out in this one; as if she were holding back in the earlier ones. For a reader unexposed to this world, it may be overwhelming.
For me, this book secured J.K. Rowling's legitimacy as an author and was the turning point to get me hooked to the whole series, since it works on so many more levels than the previous two. In "Prisoner of Azkaban",Rowling finally begins to shed some light on Harry's past, an element very briefly touched in the prior two. You also begin to see the development of familiar characters; the progression and maturity from their initial introduction in Book One. Part of Rowling's gift is making the reader feel as if they are at Hogwart's School of Wizardry with the Harry and the rest. Once accustomed to the characters, we can see how they grow. Harry begins to experience some situations typical of a young, confused boy his age (ie, he starts to stand-up for himself more against his foster family, he starts rebelling more against his professors, he finds himself in the middle of a conflict between his two best friends, etc) As a growing teenager myself, I can relate. Also, in the previous books, the story was pretty clear-cut. Of course there were unexpected twists and curveballs thrown, but when it came down to it, the reader could easily discern between the good hero and the evil antagonist at the climax. This story focuses less on the ongoing battle between Harry and his archenemy and more on the inner turmoil of a young man as he is faced with several obstacles he has to face within himself.
However, make no mistake, this story is jam-packed with action and humor that makes the book so appealing to begin with. And as I stated earlier, Rowling allows our imaginations to soar as she expands on the already well-developed world she has created. In a delightful turn of events, Harry is on his own for a few weeks, so we get a firsthand account about a "normal" city for wizards. Another plus is a newly introduced wizard settlement known as Hogsmeade, in which Rowling vividly describes the various wild shops and landmarks. Finally, the introduction of a new Defense Against Dark Arts teacher, a very interesting and well-developed man. Professor Remus Lupin's class allows Rowling's creativity to shine as she shows all these magical creatures and entities who are obviously researched and well-developed. Not only is it just fun to read, it's a great prerequisite for the totally outta-this-world follow-up, "Goblet of Fire". I love this series, and I recommend that everybody at least read "Sorceror's Stone" (1) Thanx fer taking the time to read this, I hope it was helpful in convincing you that Harry Potter is one of the best examples of literature at its best.

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