Puedes empezar a leer The Lost Fleet: Valiant: Valiant en tu Kindle en menos de un minuto. ¿No tienes un Kindle? Consigue un Kindle aquí o empieza a leer ahora con una de nuestras aplicaciones de lectura Kindle gratuitas.

Enviar a mi Kindle o a otro dispositivo

 
 
 

Pruébalo gratis

Lee el principio de este eBook gratis

Enviar a mi Kindle o a otro dispositivo

Cualquiera puede leer libros Kindle, incluso sin un dispositivo Kindle, con la aplicación gratuita Kindle para smartphones y tablets.
The Lost Fleet: Valiant: Valiant
 
Ampliar la imagen
 

The Lost Fleet: Valiant: Valiant [Versión Kindle]

Jack Campbell

Precio lista ed. impresa: EUR 10,12
Precio Kindle: EUR 4,19 IVA incluido (si corresponde) y envío a través de Amazon Whispernet
Ahorras: EUR 5,93 (59%)

Formatos

Precio Amazon Nuevo desde Usado desde
Versión Kindle EUR 4,19  
Libro de bolsillo EUR 9,44  
CD MP3, Audiolibro EUR 20,66  
Celebra el Mes del libro
Hasta -40%* en una selección de libros en inglés. * Ver condiciones.

Los clientes que compraron este producto también compraron


Descripción del producto

Descripción del producto

?Black Jack? Geary has ordered his fleet back to the Lakota Star System where the Syndics nearly destroyed them, a desperate gamble that may give them a fighting chance of survival?or tear them apart.



Detalles del producto

  • Formato: Versión Kindle
  • Tamaño del archivo: 682 KB
  • Longitud de impresión: 304
  • Números de página - ISBN de origen: 0441016197
  • Editor: Ace (24 de junio de 2008)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • ASIN: B00125L88K
  • Texto a voz: Activado
  • X-Ray:
  • Clasificación en los más vendidos de Amazon: n°41.764 Pagados en Tienda Kindle (Ver el Top 100 de pago en Tienda Kindle)

Opiniones de clientes

Todavía no hay opiniones de clientes en Amazon.es
5 estrellas
4 estrellas
3 estrellas
2 estrellas
1 estrellas
Opiniones de clientes más útiles en Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 de un máximo de 5 estrellas  107 opiniones
90 de 98 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
3.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas The Lost Editor...er...Fleet saga continues 27 de junio de 2008
Por David McCune - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Libro de bolsillo|Compra verificada por Amazon
I've enjoyed the Lost Fleet series, and I continued to enjoy it through book 4, despite its flaws. That said, the book fails the basic sequel test: if this had been the first book in the series, would I still be reading the series? At this point, my answer is "probably not".

What's still good?
The military battles are still well-described. There are better writers of speculative military fiction (Charles Stross, John Scalzi) in term of what can generally be described as "thinking up cool, futuristic stuff". Campbell excels in the telling of battles in enjoyable tactical detail in a plausible, futuristic setting. His ability to factor in time distortions, relativistic changes, simple momentum, leadership, motivation, and even navigation was what originally drew me to the series. This talent is still on display in the battle scenes of this book.

What's not so good?
It would be a stretch to say "everything else", but there are some flaws that appear to be worsening over the course of the series.

CAPT John Geary, the fleet's commander, is still the only character who seems fully fleshed out. We spend the books inside his head, and by book 4 much of the Geary internal monologue about honor, duty, ancestors, etc., is a bit repetitive. Still, Geary remains a likable, honorably motivated leader without becoming a caricature. For the rest, not so much.

Victoria Rione, is, to judge by reader comments, almost universally annoying. What's more, while her motivations initially seemed congruent with her actions, that no longer seems the case. She vacillates between insightful advisor and shrewish harridan, and I actually LIKED her character initially. Now I find myself in the camp saying "Please, someone slap her".

CAPT Desjani, the loyal subordinate and captain of the fleet flagship, still seems too 2-dimensional to function as Geary's love interest. Way too many "Rione spoke while Desjani gritted her teeth" sequences. The book has too much of this interplay. I'd bet Geary wishes Campbell would write a holo-deck into book 5 to get him out of this.

I could go on, but you get the idea.

So, if you really have enjoyed the battle sequences, as I have, then the book will probably be worth it. If you struggled through the 3rd book thinking "please don't have so much cat-fighting in the 4th", well, consider yourself warned. If you are new to the series, I can unreservedly recommend the first book, Dauntless.

I don't want to come off as too harsh. I enjoyed this book and plan to buy the 5th. I think fans of the series will generally still enjoy this entry. Still, I do think it's fair to point out what I see as areas to improve in the concluding books.

3.5 stars.
121 de 137 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
3.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Good Series... but dragging 25 de junio de 2008
Por J. Kelly - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Libro de bolsillo
My thoughts, in no specific order:

* The character of Rione has pushed beyond annoying/irritating into the "get rid of this character" territory - move her to one of her own ships, kill her off, whatever... her attitude was required in book 1, growing tiresome in book 2, and completely useless in book 3 and 4 - yes, her attitude has a different focus in this book (Desjani) but it doesn't matter - her purpose has been served. Geary is fully aware of the thin line between Hero and real-world leadership; he doesn't need Rione anymore to remind him.

* The 3rd party (aliens) storyline in the book is obviously not going to be resolved in book 5, so I fully expect a 2nd series with Geary leading both Syndic and Alliance forces against this unknown enemy. The problem I have with this is that the 3rd party was introduced in Book 1 and has dragged out to the point where I'm not sure I want to wait until 2011/2012 for this story to be completed and we find out how Geary chooses to spend the remainder of his days...

* Whereas the previous books had 2-3 well-written battle scenes in them, this one has only 1 detailed battle (1 at the end is hastily written and no explanation of where this force has jumped in from or how they happened to just 'be there') - again, this goes back to my argument that the series is losing steam.

* This series could easily have been done in a trilogy (with longer pagecounts); these books are short and can be read fairly quickly and it only makes me wary of getting started with the next Black Jack series as I'm ready to move on to something new. If the next series ends up being a 5 parter, don't say I didn't warn you.

* My biggest complaint is the author's tendency to repeat things in all 4 books (and probably will be repeated in book 5) - this includes explaining how the 100+ of ship captains use the conference room (virtual, of course), the importance of the hypernet key, how Geary was found floating suspended for 100 years, etc... any reader who cannot look in the front of the book and see this is book 4 in a series of 5 deserves to be confused... the repeated content just makes the story more tiring and comes off as "filler" so the book meets a specific page count.

* My last bit of review is a plea to the author to ask his publishers to consider releasing the next series as a 3 parter, with longer page count and shorter release periods.
26 de 26 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Excellent Military SciFi 21 de julio de 2008
Por Drew Deighan - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Libro de bolsillo
Jack Campbell (nome de plume of former U.S. Navy officer John G. Henry) has come up with a thoroughly entertaining military sci-fi series of novels with his Black Jack Geary/Lost Fleet books. I give it four stars because the books (generally) are extremely well crafted, highly entertaining efforts.

The Good:
Campbell is one of the best in his descriptive tactical and situational accounts of what large scale fleet actions in future space could be like. Detailed, but not overly-technical, descriptions of large space fleet engagements are very well thought out, yet so well written that a non-military person can grasp what's going on.

Capt. John "Black Jack" Geary is an extremely well-crafted protagonist that we immediately like and empathize with. He's the kind of man everyone wishes to known and work with and for. His struggles with his situation are grist for the mill of legends and Campbell is masterful at getting Geary and the Fleet into impossible situations and then credibly getting them out again.

In the series, the other fleet captains hinder Geary's efforts to get the fleet home safely as much as they do to help him. This makes up some of the best, most entertaining aspects of the books. This is also done in the best tradition of literary military heroes as Horatio Hornblower, Jack Aubrey and Richard Sharpe. Campbell's expert use of divisive, internal fleet politics also gives us a candid look into the military cultures of any age, not just ones in a space fleet-dominated future. Here Campbell writes with the sensitivity and authority of someone who has been on both the winning and the losing ends of such inter-personal political engagements.

The Bad:
Geary's character is very well done but other important characters are not as well-developed as you might hope. Their actions and motivations sometimes strain the credulity of the situations they find themselves in. Captain Desjani, female captain of Geary's flagship, is an interesting character but could be more so, given a little more room to breath. Her continued one-dimensional hero worship of "Geary the Legend" rings true in the first two books.

But as she is both an extremely capable and a highly intelligent, aggressive commander, she might be better served having a more visible (to the reader) internal/external conflict going on about who Geary really is and questioning his military and personal decisions, especially her continued suffering-in-silence about Geary's relationship with Victoria Rione.

Victoria Rione, as written, borders at times on clinical schizophrenia. Though an attempt is made in the third book to explain her actions over the course of the series, they often fail to jibe with the consumate politician she is initially presented as in the beginning of the series. Given all of the other problems on his plate, it is puzzling to most readers why a strong character like Geary would continue to put up with her "Three Faces of Eve" act after the first 2-3 installments, no matter how good she might be in the rack.

The overall problem is that, aside from Geary, no attempt is made to better clarify in better detail for the reader the inner thought processes and motivations that lead important characters to agree with or oppose Geary. Keeping Geary's character "in the dark" some of the time is one thing, and it's consistent that Rione might want to keep her motivations a secret from a legendary and potentially politically dangerous military leader who's seemingly returned from the dead.

What's desperately needed, most of all for Rione, is a clarification for readers of her true thoughts and motivations, especially after so many installments. By the end of Book 3, her character is not so much a difficult-to-figure femme fatale as simply an annoying, ultra-irrational sufferer of the Universe's worst cast of pre-menstrual syndrome. In book 5 (if there is one - I can't seem to find anything online about a release date) if she stays her current course, readers will be hoping that before the fleet makes it home that Madame Co_President has been inadvertantly blown out an air lock.

The Ugly:
This is nit-picking, and a relatively small burdern on the series. While it's an accepted convention to minimally re-explain certain aspects of the hero's Universe so that the individual book stands on its own, Campbell does seem to spend an inordinate amount of space re-explaining far too much that has already been covered. The series as a whole is good enough that, if you were one of those people who inadvertantly began with Book 3, you'd still probably go back and get 1 and 2 to get caught up on what you missed.

Final opinion: The Lost Fleet series is great fun and well worth the time spent in the Alliance/Syndic Universe.
4 de 4 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Geary's Point of View 30 de diciembre de 2008
Por Michael - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Libro de bolsillo
I have read a lot of comments that people have posted and so far I think a lot of them just do not get the writing style the author was going for. Most books use the point of view of many characters to assist with the story line and to flesh out certain characters. The Lost Fleet is written from just Geary's point of view. This limits how much other characters can be fleshed out to only what Geary is thinking of them at the moment. They can never really tell their side of the story and can only show their actions and intentions as interpreted by Geary.

What this does and what I think the author was going for is to create a story of isolation. I mean think about it, he's a man found after a century of floating in space only to find out he is some great hero of the past. He is automatically isolated and on the outside because of this but then you throw in the burdens of command and an enemy constantly trying to kill them all if he makes a mistake. He has thoughts and feelings that go beyond his duty but due to his honor he sticks to regulations (regarding his love interests and most everything else). This further isolates him because he can't even choose to do what his heart desires most.

Hopefully that helps some of you understand why the books are written like they are. And the 4th book, Valiant, is very good at portraying this isolation and shows that Geary is extremely human and on the verge of breaking down. He can't stop being fleet commander, he can't have the women in his life, he has secret foes that may be willing to do anything to oppose him.

I gave this book only 4 stars simply because as others have stated this series should have been condensed down into 3 books with longer page counts. I also do not like the reiteration of certain things in all 4 books. It's as if the author wants to make his books readable starting at any point. They may not make as much sense if you don't start from the first one but you wouldn't miss out on some of the detailed explanations of how things work. I don't like that.
11 de 14 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas There *is* still good "space opera"... 27 de junio de 2008
Por Amazon Customer - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato:Libro de bolsillo
Parts of this review copied from forum posts...

There's something about the "Lost Fleet" series that just draws me in, and I can't quite put my finger on it. I was thinking about it the other day, and about my first steps in SF - I think it was Heinlein in a school library, but some of my major early purchases were second hand copies of "Doc" Smith novels, and a lot of Edmund Cooper if anyone remembers him. Oh and a lot of JT Edson Westerns. So I guess I get a lot out of good old basic "good guy vs bad guy" stuff, with "good guy gets the girl" thrown in. Hmm - doesn't that describe 90% of SF?

I was *going* to say that "Valiant" seems to slow down the seeming breakneck pace of the Lost Fleet through Syndic space, but a quick review tells me that isn't really true (four systems if my count is correct).

What is true is that the first two thirds of the book (more or less) deal with the return of the fleet to the Lakota system, and what they encounter there after so recently fleeing from it. What we see here is a great example of Jack Campbell's ability to bring naval battles in space to life for us. Some of my earliest reading in SF was "Doc" Smith, and although this is a little more "realistic", it made me nostalgic. (Nobody uses the word "ravening" any more. Why?!)

What we also see in this first section, and even more so later in the book, is excellent development of existing characters and plot elements and some exciting new twists. I won't discuss them in any length for fear of spoiling the fun, but hint at treason and possible new allies in unexpected places.

I am becoming thoroughly engrossed as the series progresses, and I think the story is developing a depth to match.

I must say, the thing that has me wondering now is whether or not the series will end in a triumphant return to Alliance space, or if the return will be a mere prelude to even more shenanigans. The way it is being set up, I think there are going to be many more questions and plot elements to resolve once the fleet gets home, and I hope the author is planning to answer them.
Ir a Amazon.com para ver las 107 opiniones existentes 4.1 de un máximo de 5 estrellas

Subrayados populares

 (¿Qué es esto?)
&quote;
Humans fear death and pain, and when we reach beyond that fear to protect others, we have done something to be proud of. &quote;
Subrayado por 13 usuarios de Kindle
&quote;
Ive found it hard to overestimate the ability of any system to promote stupid people. &quote;
Subrayado por 10 usuarios de Kindle
&quote;
Sir, winning is usually a matter of making one less mistake than the enemy or just getting up one more time than you get knocked down. &quote;
Subrayado por 8 usuarios de Kindle

Los clientes que resaltaron este elemento también resaltaron


Buscar productos similares por categoría


ARRAY(0xaeb73438)