• Precio final del producto
Envío en 6 a 10 días.
Vendido y enviado por ErgodeBooks Ships From USA.
EUR 78,31 + EUR 2,99 de gastos de envío
+ EUR 2,99 de gastos de envío
De 2ª mano: Bueno | Detalles
Estado: De 2ª mano: Bueno
Comentario: Buy with confidence. Excellent Customer Service & Return policy.Ships from USA. Please give between 2-5 week for delivery. 24*7 Customer Service.
¿Tienes uno para vender? Vender en Amazon
Volver atrás Ir adelante
Escuchar Reproduciendo... Interrumpido   Estás escuchando una muestra de la edición de audio Audible.
Más información
Ver las 2 imágenes

Avionics Training: Systems, Installation And Troubleshooting (Inglés) Tapa blanda – 30 jun 2005


Ver los formatos y ediciones Ocultar otros formatos y ediciones
Precio Amazon
Nuevo desde Usado desde
Tapa blanda
EUR 78,31
EUR 78,31 EUR 57,91
click to open popover

Descripción del producto

Reseña del editor

"AVIONICS TRAINING" is the first book to respond to new directions in the avionics industry. As electronics spread through every type of aircraft, there is a rising need for technicians who understand "systems," not circuits. Such knowledge is required to identify faulty units aboard the airplane, often during a quick turn time on the ramp. The book explains systems in simple terms, with over 400 full-color photos and drawings. The book assumes no knowledge of electronics, containing neither formulas nor schematics. It describes over 30 systems and how they relate to each other. Confusing acronyms and abbreviations are avoided; they're spelled out on every page. The book deals with two major trends. First, airlines are insisting that mechanics troubleshoot avionics on the flight line. It's becoming too costly for airlines to staff outlying line stations with "radio mechanics." Many carriers already require all maintenance people to obtain an FCC license and cross-training in avionics is growing. The second trend is the disappearing "avionics bench technician." When today's computerized avionics go bad, they're sent back to the factory because shops can't afford large automatic test stations and software to repair them. The demand today is for people skilled in "R&R" (remove and replace)---which requires systems-level knowledge. The scope of "Avionics Training" includes all legacy systems---VOR, ILS and ADF, for example---because they will continue to fly for decades. The book also covers the new generation now entering flight decks; satellite navigation, data communications and electronic flight instruments (EFIS). Weather detection, collision avoidance (TCAS) and Mode S transponders are also covered. Much of the book is devoted to hands-on guidance on how to install instruments, wiring harnesses, radio trays, connectors, antennas and other practical topics related to systems. A final section describes test and troubleshooting techniques. Besides the technician, "Avionics Training" should prove of interest to the engineer and executive wanting a broader knowledge of avionics industry practices. The book has already been adopted by several colleges and other teaching institutions. "Avionics Training" is the first book to explain systems in simple terms, with over 400 full-color photos and dra wings. The book assumes no knowledge of electronics, containing neither formulas nor schematics. It describes over 30 systems and how they relate to each other. Confusing acronyms and abbreviations are avoided; they're spelled out on every page. The book responds two major trends. First, airlines are insisting that A&P mechanics troubleshoot avionics on the flight line. It's becoming too costly for airlines to staff outlying line stations with "radio mechanics." Many carriers already require A&P's to obtain an FCC license and cross-training in avionics is growing. The second trend is the disappearing "avionics bench technician." When today's computerized avionics go bad, they're sent back to the factory because shops can't afford large automatic test stations and software to repair them. The demand today is for people skilled in "R&R" (remove and replace)---which requires systems-level knowledge. The scope of "Avionics Training" includes all legacy systems---VOR, ILS and ADF, for example---because they will continue to fly for decades. The book also covers the new generation now entering flight decks; satellite navigation, data communications and electronic flight instruments (EFIS). Weather detection, collision avoidance (TCAS) and Mode S transponders are also covered. Much of the book is devoted to hands-on guidance on how to install instruments, wiring harnesses, radio trays, connectors, antennas and other practical topics related to systems. A final section describes test and troubleshooting techniques. Besides the technician, "Avionics Training" should prove of interest to the engineer and executive wanting a broader knowledge of avionics industry practices. The book has already been adopted by several colleges and other teaching institutions. The author, Len Buckwalter, has been in the avionics industry for 30 years, having written 25 books and over 2000 articles. He founded Avionics Magazine and served as Publisher and Editor for 17 years. He is an instrument-rated pilot with 3000 flight hours, and is presently publisher of the Avionics Library at www.avionics.com A 50-page sampling of the book, with Table of Contents and chapters can be browsed at: www.avionics.com/downloads/Training sample pages.pdf Title: Avionics Training: Systems, Installation and Troubleshooting ISBN 1-88-5544-21-9 Cat. No. AT-01 Size: 8-1/2 x 11 Illustrations: 400 (4-color) Pages: 320 Price: $64.00 Publication date: June, 2005 Contact: Len Buckwalter len@avionics.com Avionics Communications Inc.P.O. Box 2628, Leesburg, VA 20177 Tel: 703 777-9535 Fax: 703 777-9568 New Book Announcement "AVIONICS TRAINING" is the first book to respond to new directions in the avionics industry Leesburg Virginia (May 7, 2005) As electronics spread through every type of aircraft, there is a rising need for technicians who understand "systems," not circuits. Such knowledge is required to identify faulty units aboard the airplane, often during a quick turn time on the ramp. "Avionics Training" is the first book to explain systems in simple terms, with over 400 full-color photos and drawings. The book assumes no knowledge of electronics, containing neither formulas nor schematics. It describes over 30 systems and how they relate to each other. Confusing acronyms and abbreviations are avoided; they're spelled out on every page. The book responds two major trends. First, airlines are insisting that A&P mechanics troubleshoot avionics on the flight line. It's becoming too costly for airlines to staff outlying line stations with "radio mechanics." Many carriers already require A&P's to obtain an FCC license and cross-training in avionics is growing. The second trend is the disappearing "avionics bench technician." When today's computerized avionics go bad, they're sent back to the factory because shops can't afford large automatic test stations and software to repair them. The demand today is for people skilled in "R&R" (remove and replace)---which requires systems-level knowledge. Confirmation of these trends was heard at a recent ATEC (Aviation Technician Education Council) meeting held in Orlando, FL. Over 100 attendees were nearly unanimous in their plans to add avionics training to A&P mechanic programs. The scope of "Avionics Training" includes all legacy systems---VOR, ILS and ADF, for example---because they will continue to fly for decades. The book also covers the new generation now entering flight decks; satellite navigation, data communications and electronic flight instruments (EFIS). Weather detection, collision avoidance (TCAS) and Mode S transponders are also covered. Much of the book is devoted to hands-on guidance on how to install instruments, wiring harnesses, radio trays, connectors, antennas and other practical topics related to systems. A final section describes test and troubleshooting techniques. Besides the technician, "Avionics Training" should prove of interest to the engineer and executive wanting a broader knowledge of avionics industry practices. The book has already been adopted by several colleges and other teaching institutions. The author, Len Buckwalter, has been in the avionics industry for 30 years, having written 25 books and over 2000 articles. He founded Avionics Magazine and served as Publisher and Editor for 17 years. He is an instrument-rated pilot with 3000 flight hours, and is presently publisher of the Avionics Library at www.avionics.com A 50-page sampling of the book, with Table of Contents and chapters can be browsed at: www.avionics.com/downloads/Training sample pages.pdf Title: Avionics Training: Systems, Installation and Troubleshooting ISBN 1-88-5544-21-9 Cat. No. AT-01 Size: 8-1/2 x 11 Illustrations: 400 (4-color) Pages: 320 Price: $64.00 Publication date: June, 2005 Contact: Len Buckwalter len@avionics.com Avionics Communications Inc.P.O. Box 2628, Leesburg, VA 20177 Tel: 703 777-9535 Fax: 703 777-9568 New Book Announcement "AVIONICS TRAINING" is the first book to respond to new directions in the avionics industry Leesburg Virginia (May 7, 2005) As electronics spread through every type of aircraft, there is a rising need for technicians who understand "systems," not circuits. Such knowledge is required to identify faulty units aboard the airplane, often during a quick turn time on the ramp. "Avionics Training" is the first book to explain systems in simple terms, with over 400 full-color photos and drawings. The book assumes no knowledge of electronics, containing neither formulas nor schematics. It describes over 30 systems and how they relate to each other. Confusing acronyms and abbreviations are avoided; they're spelled out on every page. The book responds two major trends. First, airlines are insisting that A&P mechanics troubleshoot avionics on the flight line. It's becoming too costly for airlines to staff outlying line stations with "radio mechanics." Many carriers already require A&P's to obtain an FCC license and cross-training in avionics is growing. The second trend is the disappearing "avionics bench technician." When today's computerized avionics go bad, they're sent back to the factory because shops can't afford large a097668750X\\ Brace yourself as you experience how the compromised lives of four women are entangled in this powerful drama. Help Wanted is a page-turning tale that reveals sex, scandal and deceit.

Biografía del autor

The author, Len Buckwalter, has been in the avionics industry for 30 years, having written 25 books and over 2000 articles. He founded Avionics Magazine and served as Publisher and Editor for 17 years. He is an instrument-rated pilot with 3000 flight hours, and is presently publisher of the Avionics Library at www.avionics.com

No es necesario ningún dispositivo Kindle. Descárgate una de las apps de Kindle gratuitas para comenzar a leer libros Kindle en tu smartphone, tablet u ordenador.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Obtén la app gratuita:



Semana del Libro
Celebra con nosotros la lectura Ver más

Detalles del producto


Opiniones de clientes

No hay opiniones de clientes
Comparte tu opinión con otros clientes

Opiniones de clientes más útiles en Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 4,1 de 5 estrellas 19 opiniones
H. Leupp
5,0 de 5 estrellasGreat help with aircraft instruments
3 de noviembre de 2017 - Publicado en Amazon.com
Compra verificada
A una persona le ha parecido esto útil.
Captain J
3,0 de 5 estrellasYou get the same info on Wikipedia
28 de noviembre de 2011 - Publicado en Amazon.com
Compra verificada
A una persona le ha parecido esto útil.
gabrial stone
4,0 de 5 estrellasFour Stars
9 de septiembre de 2017 - Publicado en Amazon.com
Compra verificada
Amazon Customer
3,0 de 5 estrellasGood as an introduction to basic avionics but from a ...
13 de octubre de 2016 - Publicado en Amazon.com
Compra verificada
Gary E. Wcislo
5,0 de 5 estrellasFive Stars
25 de septiembre de 2015 - Publicado en Amazon.com
Compra verificada