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Everyman de [Roth, Philip]
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Everyman Versión Kindle


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Versión Kindle
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Versión Kindle, 9 may 2006
EUR 8,55
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EUR 20,71 EUR 3,65

Longitud: 193 páginas Word Wise: Activado Tipografía mejorada: Activado
Volteo de página: Activado Idioma: Inglés

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Descripción del producto

Críticas

"Through it all, there's that Rothian voice: pained, angry, arrogant and deeply, wryly funny. Nothing escapes him."

"Let's use a noun I've never used before: masterpiece."

"This brilliant little morality play on the ways that our bodies dictate the paths our lives take is vintage Roth"

"Same old terrain, same ever-astonishing mastery."

"Let's not crank up the suspense. He's done it again"

"Mr. Roth, our best literary stylist...does an impressive job on his chosen turf."

..."an instance of Roth writing at the top of his bent and to maximum effect"

"[Everyman] is a parable that captures, as few works of fiction have, the pathos of Being."

"Our most accomplished novelist. . . . ÝWith "Everyman"¨ personal tenderness has reached a new intensity."
--"The New Yorker"
"If descriptive amplitude went out with the nineteenth century, Philip Roth, who strides the whole time and territory of the word, has resuscitated it - in description revved with the power of narrative itself."
--"The New York Times Book Review"
"Let's use a noun I've never used before: masterpiece."
--"Atlantic Monthly"
"ÝRoth is¨ as essential to the experience of modern America-its literature, history, and moral reckoning-as any writer on the planet."
--"The Boston Globe"

" Our most accomplished novelist. . . . [With "Everyman"] personal tenderness has reached a new intensity."
-- "The New Yorker"
" If descriptive amplitude went out with the nineteenth century, Philip Roth, who strides the whole time and territory of the word, has resuscitated it - in description revved with the power of narrative itself."
-- "The New York Times Book Review"
" Let's use a noun I've never used before: masterpiece."
-- "Atlantic Monthly"
" [Roth is] as essential to the experience of modern America- its literature, history, and moral reckoning- as any writer on the planet."
-- "The Boston Globe"

"Our most accomplished novelist. . . . [With "Everyman"] personal tenderness has reached a new intensity."
"The New Yorker"
If descriptive amplitude went out with the nineteenth century, Philip Roth, who strides the whole time and territory of the word, has resuscitated it in description revved with the power of narrative itself.
"The New York Times Book Review"
"Let's use a noun I've never used before: masterpiece."
"Atlantic Monthly"
[Roth is] as essential to the experience of modern America its literature, history, and moral reckoning as any writer on the planet.
"The Boston Globe""

"Our most accomplished novelist. . . . [With Everyman] personal tenderness has reached a new intensity."
--The New Yorker
"If descriptive amplitude went out with the nineteenth century, Philip Roth, who strides the whole time and territory of the word, has resuscitated it - in description revved with the power of narrative itself."
--The New York Times Book Review
"Let's use a noun I've never used before: masterpiece."
--Atlantic Monthly
"[Roth is] as essential to the experience of modern America-its literature, history, and moral reckoning-as any writer on the planet."
--The Boston Globe

-Our most accomplished novelist. . . . [With Everyman] personal tenderness has reached a new intensity.-
--The New Yorker
-If descriptive amplitude went out with the nineteenth century, Philip Roth, who strides the whole time and territory of the word, has resuscitated it - in description revved with the power of narrative itself.-
--The New York Times Book Review
-Let's use a noun I've never used before: masterpiece.-
--Atlantic Monthly
-[Roth is] as essential to the experience of modern America-its literature, history, and moral reckoning-as any writer on the planet.-
--The Boston Globe

Descripción del producto

Philip Roth's new novel is a candidly intimate yet universal story of loss, regret, and stoicism. The best-selling author of The Plot Against America now turns his attention from "one family's harrowing encounter with history" (New York Times) to one man's lifelong skirmish with mortality.

The fate of Roth's everyman is traced from his first shocking confrontation with death on the idyllic beaches of his childhood summers, through the family trials and professional achievements of his vigorous adulthood, and into his old age, when he is rended by observing the deterioration of his contemporaries and stalked by his own physical woes.

A successful commercial artist with a New York ad agency, he is the father of two sons from a first marriage who despise him and a daughter from a second marriage who adores him. He is the beloved brother of a good man whose physical well-being comes to arouse his bitter envy, and he is the lonely ex-husband of three very different women with whom he's made a mess of marriage. In the end he is a man who has become what he does not want to be.

The terrain of this powerful novel -- Roth's twenty-seventh book and the fifth to be published in the twenty-first century -- is the human body. Its subject is the common experience that terrifies us all.

Everyman takes its title from an anonymous fifteenth-century allegorical play, a classic of early English drama, whose theme is the summoning of the living to death.

Detalles del producto

  • Formato: Versión Kindle
  • Tamaño del archivo: 533 KB
  • Longitud de impresión: 193
  • Editor: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (9 de mayo de 2006)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • ASIN: B003JFJHPW
  • Texto a voz: Activado
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Activado
  • Lector con pantalla: Compatibles
  • Tipografía mejorada: Activado
  • Valoración media de los clientes: Sé el primero en opinar sobre este producto
  • Clasificación en los más vendidos de Amazon: n.° 175.638 de Pago en Tienda Kindle (Ver el Top 100 de pago en Tienda Kindle)
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Opiniones de clientes más útiles en Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.1 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 198 opiniones
2 de 2 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas "Everyman" may not be every man, but it does capture many American male struggles and angst 11 de octubre de 2009
Por cs211 - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda Compra verificada
The popularity and critical acclaim that Philip Roth has earned over the course of a fifty year literary career must stem from some basic truths that appeal to a fairly wide audience of readers and critics. If these truths weren't clear by now, "Everyman" makes them readily apparent: Philip Roth's works speak to the struggles, angst, foibles and follies of the educated upper middle class American male. What women may think of Philip Roth I have no idea, except by judging the reactions of female readers, which tend to be much less positive than male readers' reactions. Perhaps what Oprah and "The View" do for women, Philip Roth does for men.

The basic structure of "Everyman" is a man recounting (and often lamenting) the major episodes in his life, as he looks back while facing the inevitable and yet unpredictable end. "Everyman" springs from earth that Roth has tilled many times before: childhood in northeastern New Jersey; love, intimacy, marriage and divorce; family, especially fathers and brothers; and physical ailments and death. There is a particular emphasis in "Everyman" on the travails of aging, and the inevitable, inexorable decline as each person falls from the height of his powers to an often slow, agonizing, lonely death.

Although the details of each man's life differ, I believe that many upper middle class American men will identify with the struggles of the main character in "Everyman". He divorces three times, and while not every American man will do so, I think most will be able to identify with the forces that the main character struggles with. As time goes on, he ends up estranged from several close relations and his loneliness mounts, which are certainly issues that many older people face. The portrayal that "Everyman" presents of aging and death is not a nice one, but it may be an all too common one.

Being a short novel, "Everyman" does not have the space for long tangential off-shoots of narrative, or passages rooted in alternate realities, or other literary techniques employed by Roth in his longer works. In that sense it is one of his more straightforward works, and yet it does read as a complete unabbreviated work. Because Roth is capable of much more inventive works of literature, I wouldn't rank "Everyman" among his best, but for what it is, a short novel, it did please this reader.
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas "Roth's complaint" - now as an old man 14 de junio de 2016
Por Bent Dalager - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
A classic Philip Roth book with thoughts about life, it's meaning and how we as human often gets things completely wrong even when we know it's wrong. It has clear marks of his own age and is at time almost depressing to read Roths reflections about becoming old. It's no so much old and wise as it is old, sick and lonely. But the writing is excellent and Philip Roth is giving a great and truly multi-faceted portrait of the main character and his life with and without women.
1 de 1 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Five Stars 19 de septiembre de 2016
Por R A A. 111 - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
Roth at his Rothian best.
9 de 9 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Not Roth's Best, but ... 23 de mayo de 2006
Por Federico (Fred) Moramarco - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa dura Compra verificada
Everyman takes us on a life journey and as everyone knows by know, Roth was using the great medieval allegorical drama of the same title as his model. This is a book about cosmic angst, about facing the oblivion that awaits us as we age. Roth has tackled this subject before--in some sense, all major writers have tackled it. In the introduction to Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut, quoting Ferdinand Celine writes, "No art is possible without a duty dance with death." So here is Roth's duty dance, although he has certainly waltzed across this floor before in the Zuckerman books, "Sabbath's Theater,""The Dying Animal," and in many other of his 26 books.

The treatment here is a bit different--more relentless and focussed, although at the same time, more generalized and abstract. Although all of the people around the unnamed narrator are specified, he remains something of a cipher, and certainly doesn't have the presence of a Zuckerman or a Portnoy. Nonetheless, the book makes for engaging reading. Roth's lesser works are more compelling than the work of most American writers.
4 de 6 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas The Road Most Traveled 19 de junio de 2006
Por Thomas M. Loarie - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa dura Compra verificada
I am not a fan of fiction nor am I familiar with Philip Roth. But, after reading a review of Philip Roth's "Everyman," I made an exception and bought it. I am glad I did. I found the book and Roth to be exceptional.

"Everyman" is the story of a successful advertising executive coming to grips with his own mortality. As he does, Roth takes us into his mind as he reviews his life - a life filled with poor judgment, irresponsibility, and lost opportunities for happiness, or at least peace. "He'd married three times, had mistresses and children and an interesting job where he'd been a success, but now eluding death seemed to have become the central business of his life and bodily decay his entire story."

Roth's "everyman" is self-absorbed, repeatedly taking the path "most traveled," a path blind to the truth of life. As illness takes over and the end nears, "everyman" begins to grasp truth and the source of life's real value. "When you are young, it's the outside of your body that matters, how you look externally. When you get older, it's what's inside that matters, and people stop caring about how you look."

But it is too late, "there's no remaking reality." Relationships are irretrievably lost and time has run out for meaningful pursuits.

This is not another "Tuesdays with Morrie," but rather, serves as a stark contrast to it. "Tuesdays" highlights an enlightened path to a peaceful death. Roth's "Everyman" highlights an unenlightened path that leads to loneliness and despair.

Roth, a gifted writer, insures that his "Everyman" will disturb most "everyman" who is over 50 and on the road "most traveled."
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