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The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus (Canongate Myths series) de [Atwood, Margaret]
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The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus (Canongate Myths series) Versión Kindle

5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 3 opiniones de clientes

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Longitud: 218 páginas Word Wise: Activado Tipografía mejorada: Activado
Volteo de página: Activado Idioma: Inglés

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Críticas

Half-Dorothy Parker, half-Desperate Housewives. * Independent * As potent as a curse. -- Lucy Hughes Hallett * Sunday Times * Pragmatic, clever, domestic, mournful, Penelope is a perfect Atwood heroine. -- Sam Leith * Spectator * Atwood takes Penelope's part with tremendous verve...she explores the very nature of mythic story-telling. -- Mary Beard * Guardian * Atwood's typical wit and vim on fine display: with the late maids providing a Greek chorus, Penelope swoops across the centuries to pithily slate her cousin Helen of Troy, judge Odysseus and even provide a feminist viewpoint of which Homer could nary have dreamt. * Observer *

Descripción del producto

For Penelope, wife of Odyseeus, maintaining a kingdom while her husband was off fighting the Trojan war was not a simple business. Already aggrieved that he had been lured away due to the shocking behaviour of her beautiful cousin Helen, Penelope must bring up her wayward son, face down scandalous rumours and keep over a hundred lustful, greedy and bloodthirsty suitors at bay...

Detalles del producto

  • Formato: Versión Kindle
  • Tamaño del archivo: 800 KB
  • Longitud de impresión: 218
  • Editor: Canongate Books; Edición: Main - New cover edition (31 de octubre de 2003)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • ASIN: B002VNFNGA
  • Texto a voz: Activado
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  • Word Wise: Activado
  • Lector con pantalla: Compatibles
  • Tipografía mejorada: Activado
  • Valoración media de los clientes: 5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 3 opiniones de clientes
  • Clasificación en los más vendidos de Amazon: n.° 42.398 de Pago en Tienda Kindle (Ver el Top 100 de pago en Tienda Kindle)
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El libro me ha sorprendido bastante, la verdad es que su lectura es muy amena y refleja muy bien la situación e inseguridades de la mujer en la época clásica desde el punto de vista de Penélope. Lo recomiendo muchísimo a aquellos que quieran tener otra perspectiva de la Odisea de Homero.
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This is a stocking filler for my husband who thought he had read all of Margaret Attwoods books untill I started reading them out on amazon and he will enjoy this immensely, arrived in perfect condition as always, thanks.
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I bought this book because I needed it for a course in Gender and Literature. It is amazing! I love this book and I'll re-read it as soon as possible.
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Amazon.com: 4.2 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 188 opiniones
4 de 4 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas “The ever-faithful… 17 de febrero de 2017
Por John P. Jones III - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
Penelope”… is how Homer invariably described the wife of Odysseus. I recently read and reviewed Classical Mythology: A Very Short Introduction. Among the numerous takeaways, the author, Helen Morales, stressed that the myths are variable over time, often to fit the particular needs of the teller in a later era. Different aspects of the myth are stressed or changed.

Margaret Atwood is a prolific Canadian writer whom I have regrettably never read before. I do recall seeing her work, The Blind Assassin: A Novel on the convenient dining room table of one of the Canadians that I knew in Riyadh, who read serious books, way back in the year 2000, when Atwood was awarded the Man Booker Prize for that work.

Sure, the focus has always been on the soldier, Odysseus, who went away to a foreign war, took a long time to get back home due to numerous pleasant and unpleasant distractions, and received the classic “bad homecoming” when he arrived. With a bit of gender-empathy, it was only natural for Atwood to reflect upon that “ever-faithful” wife, as well, as the author says, the fate of the 12 maids that Odysseus hanged – the “collateral damage.”

In the introduction, Atwood calls her work an “echo” to the sixth power… an “echo of an echo of…” etc. First, you had the original event… the siege of Troy, somewhere in the 12th or 13th century BCE. Then you have Homer’s telling of the story, some four centuries later… Atwood says: “Penelope is perhaps the first desperate housewife to appear in art.” Atwood’s “Penelopiad” is a play, an additional four “echoes” later, that was first performed at The Swan Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon, in 2007.

Penelope is in Hades, with the Maids that have been hanged. Ah, the truth can now come out. Indicative of Atwood’s more modern, “hip” style, she has Penelope declare early on: “For hadn’t I been faithful? Didn’t I wait, and wait, despite the temptations – almost the compulsion – to do otherwise? And yet what have I amounted to, now the official version has gained ground? An edifying legend. A stick used to beat other women with. Why can’t they be as considerate, as trustworthy, as all-suffering as I was? That’s the line they take, the singers, the yarn-spinners. Don’t follow my example, I want to scream in your ears…” It’s brilliant. “A stick used to beat…”

There were aspects of my reading of Odyssey that I had forgotten, perhaps because at the time they seemed like minor points. Penelope was the daughter of King Icarius, of Sparta, who feared that she might kill him when she grew up, due to a prophesy, so he ordered her drowned, which did not, obviously work out. Penelope was a cousin of Helen, yes, the face that launched those proverbial 1000 ships, and Atwood plays on that relationship. “They were all staring at Helen, who was intolerably beautiful, as usual. Like every other man on earth, Odysseus had desperately wanted to win her hand. I was at best only second prize.” Atwood empathetically describes the lives of the Maids, who are only “deep background” for Homer.

Indeed, what is the appropriate conduct for an “ever-faithful” wife when she knows her husband has been servicing the goddess Calypso for several years? Atwood hints at the answer towards the end. “The two of us were now proficient and shameless liars of long standing. It’s a wonder either one of us believed a word the other said. But we did. Or so we told each other.”

A 5-star spin of a classic myth.
3 de 3 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
3.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Penelope and The Hanged Maids, a Satire on The Odyssey 10 de junio de 2014
Por Christopher Walborn - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
In The Penelopiad Margaret Atwood gives us a satirical view of the events of The Odyssey. Penelope and her twelve hanged maids speak to us from Hades in our own time, which allows the author to present her work with the convenience of modern perspectives on sex, class, and the gods. The tone remains light and unlabored throughout, even while implicating the patriarchal values of the Homeric world. Penelope speaks from her position as an elite woman, burdened beneath the role her society has forced upon her, while the hanged maids expose the raw inequality suffered by female servants.

That Atwood is a gifted writer is obvious, however The Penelopiad seems a rather short and fast work on these themes. I could imagine them drawn out and explored in much greater detail, though perhaps not while maintaining the lightness of tone. The chorus sections, those of the hanged maids, provide a verse burlesque complimenting and contrasting against the prose of Penelope. These chapters provide a welcome counterpoint, and often heighten the impact of the satire. But the verses, themselves, sometimes seem unpolished and dashed off.

The Penelopiad is an slight novel by a great writer, and perhaps re-reading will reveal the novel as something grander and richer than petite four that it appears to be.
2 de 2 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas An Old tale Told From A New Perspective 23 de febrero de 2014
Por Paige Ellen - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
I did enjoy this book very much. Ever wonder what Persophone's life was like while Odysseus was off to war? Margaret Atwood gives her imaginative answer to that question in this book. With beguiling creativity, Atwood deftly tells of how Persephone acted as well as what she thought. There is subtle yet nasty humor here and songs (as in a Greek chorus) from her 12 youngest and prettiest maids. They are bitter because they were murdered by Odysseus and Telemachus, after secretly serving as Persophone's spies within the mob of suitors seeking to replace Odysseus as the man of the house.
The reader will find that the meter and rhythm of the choruses bleeds over into the text that follows them. This is delightful use of prose. All-in-all, it is Atwood's fruitful imagination that wins the day here. This is a spell-binding read, well worth the reader's time. Enjoy!
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5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Myth from a new perspective... 28 de junio de 2015
Por MICHAEL - Publicado en Amazon.com
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An excellent companion and retelling of "The Odyssey" from Penelope's perspective. The writing is quick, witty, and thought-provoking; I gobbled it up in a few hours. I plan on using this text with my high school students during our study on myth. Atwood does a sublime job at bringing the strong, female voice to a genre dominated by men. In many ways it does what C.S. Lewis does with "Till We Have Faces", but in a much more contemporary voice. Any student of mythology will enjoy this or will learn to consider the world of myth from a different perspective.
1 de 1 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Penelope from the Dark Side 4 de octubre de 2016
Por Amazon Customer - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda Compra verificada
I really enjoyed this book. It is the story of Penelope and Odysseus told from Penelope's viewpoint after her death.
She tells her side of the story of Helen of Troy, what Odysseus was up to, her maid's actions, and the suitors who
tried to woo her during Odysseus' absence. Overall an entertaining twist on the myth.
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