No es necesario ningún dispositivo Kindle. Descárgate una de las apps de Kindle gratuitas para comenzar a leer libros Kindle en tu smartphone, tablet u ordenador.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Obtén la app gratuita:

Precio lista ed. digital: EUR 9,44
Precio Kindle: EUR 6,61

Ahorra EUR 1,38 (17%)

IVA incluido (si corresponde)

Estas promociones se aplicarán a este artículo:

Algunas promociones pueden combinarse; otras no. Para más detalles, revisa los términos y condiciones de cada promoción.

Enviar a mi Kindle o a otro dispositivo

Enviar a mi Kindle o a otro dispositivo

When The Emperor Was Divine de [Otsuka, Julie]
Anuncio de app de Kindle

When The Emperor Was Divine Versión Kindle

5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 1 opinión de cliente

Ver los 12 formatos y ediciones Ocultar otros formatos y ediciones
Precio Amazon
Nuevo desde Usado desde
Versión Kindle
"Vuelva a intentarlo"
EUR 6,61
Tapa dura
"Vuelva a intentarlo"
EUR 33,00 EUR 17,09

Longitud: 162 páginas Word Wise: Activado Tipografía mejorada: Activado
Volteo de página: Activado Idioma: Inglés

Kindle Unlimited
Lee más de 1 millón de eBooks en cualquier dispositivo Kindle o en la aplicación gratuita Kindle. Pruébalo gratis durante 30 días

Descripción del producto

Críticas

"Exceptional. . . . Otsuka skillfully dramatizes a world suddenly foreign. . . . [Her] incantatory, unsentimental prose is the book's greatest strength." -"The New Yorker
"
"Spare, incisive. . . . The mood of the novel tensely reflects the protagonists' emotional state: calm surfaces above, turmoil just beneath." -"Boston Globe
""A timely examination of mass hysteria in troubled times. . . . Otsuka combines interesting facts and tragic emotions with a steady, pragmatic hand."-"The Oregonian
"
"Prose so cool and precise that it's impossible not to believe what [Otsuka] tells us or to see clearly what she wants us to see. . . . A gem of a book and one of the most vivid history lessons you'll ever learn." -"USA Today "
"With a matter-of-fact brilliance, and a poise as prominent in the protagonist as it is in the writing, When the Emperor Was Divine is a novel about loyalty, about identity, and about being other in America during uncertain times." -Nathan Englander, author of For the Relief of Unbearable Urges
"Shockingly brilliant. . . . it will make you gasp . . . Undoubtedly one of the most effective, memorable books to deal with the internment crisis . . . The maturity of Otsuka's. . . prose is astonishing." "-- The Bloomsbury Review
""The novel's voice is as hushed as a whisper. . . . An exquisite debut. . . potent, spare, crystalline." -"O, The Oprah Magazine
"
"At once delicately poetic and unstintingly unsentimental." "--St. Petersburg Times"
"Heartbreaking, bracingly unsentimental. . . .rais[es] the specter of wartime injustice in bone-chilling fashion. . . . The novel's honesty and matter-of-fact tone in the face of inconceivable injustice are the source of its power. . . . Dazzling." -"Publishers Weekly"
"Otsuka . . . demonstrates a breathtaking restraint and delicacy throughout this supple and devastating first novel ." -"Booklist"
"Spare yet poignant. . . . clear, elegant prose." -"Library Journal"
"Her voice never falters, equally adept at capturing horrific necessity and accidental beauty. Her unsung prisoners of war contend with multiple front lines, and enemies who wear the faces of neighbors and friends. It only takes a few pages to join their cause, but by the time you finish this exceptional debut, you will recognize that their struggle has always been yours." -Colson Whitehead, author of John Henry Days
"Heartbreaking. . . . A crystalline account." -"The Seattle Post-Intelligencer "

Exceptional. . . . Otsuka skillfully dramatizes a world suddenly foreign. . . . [Her] incantatory, unsentimental prose is the book s greatest strength. The New Yorker

Spare, incisive. . . . The mood of the novel tensely reflects the protagonists emotional state: calm surfaces above, turmoil just beneath. Boston Globe
A timely examination of mass hysteria in troubled times. . . . Otsuka combines interesting facts and tragic emotions with a steady, pragmatic hand. The Oregonian

Prose so cool and precise that it s impossible not to believe what [Otsuka] tells us or to see clearly what she wants us to see. . . . A gem of a book and one of the most vivid history lessons you ll ever learn. USA Today
With a matter-of-fact brilliance, and a poise as prominent in the protagonist as it is in the writing, When the Emperor Was Divine is a novel about loyalty, about identity, and about being other in America during uncertain times. Nathan Englander, author of For the Relief of Unbearable Urges
Shockingly brilliant. . . . it will make you gasp . . . Undoubtedly one of the most effective, memorable books to deal with the internment crisis . . . The maturity of Otsuka s. . . prose is astonishing. The Bloomsbury Review
The novel s voice is as hushed as a whisper. . . . An exquisite debut. . . potent, spare, crystalline. O, The Oprah Magazine

At once delicately poetic and unstintingly unsentimental. --St. Petersburg Times
Heartbreaking, bracingly unsentimental. . . .rais[es] the specter of wartime injustice in bone-chilling fashion. . . . The novel s honesty and matter-of-fact tone in the face of inconceivable injustice are the source of its power. . . . Dazzling. Publishers Weekly
Otsuka . . . demonstrates a breathtaking restraint and delicacy throughout this supple and devastating first novel . Booklist
Spare yet poignant. . . . clear, elegant prose. Library Journal
Her voice never falters, equally adept at capturing horrific necessity and accidental beauty. Her unsung prisoners of war contend with multiple front lines, and enemies who wear the faces of neighbors and friends. It only takes a few pages to join their cause, but by the time you finish this exceptional debut, you will recognize that their struggle has always been yours. Colson Whitehead, author of John Henry Days
Heartbreaking. . . . A crystalline account. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer "

Descripción del producto

Longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction

It is four months after Pearl Harbour and overnight signs appear all over the United States instructing Japanese Americans to report to internment camps for the duration of the war. For one family it proves to be a nightmare of oppression and alienation. Explored from varying points of view - the mother receiving the order to evacuate; the daughter on the long train journey; the son in the desert encampment; the family's return home; and the bitter release of their father after four years in captivity - it tells of an incarceration that will alter their lives for ever.

Based on a true story, Julie Otsuka's powerful, deeply humane novel tells of an unjustly forgotten episode in America's wartime history.


Detalles del producto

  • Formato: Versión Kindle
  • Tamaño del archivo: 613 KB
  • Longitud de impresión: 162
  • Editor: Fig Tree; Edición: New edition (5 de abril de 2012)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • ISBN-10: 0241145724
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241145722
  • ASIN: B007IO1XDE
  • Texto a voz: Activado
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Activado
  • Lector con pantalla: Compatibles
  • Tipografía mejorada: Activado
  • Valoración media de los clientes: 5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 1 opinión de cliente
  • Clasificación en los más vendidos de Amazon: n.° 128.975 de Pago en Tienda Kindle (Ver el Top 100 de pago en Tienda Kindle)
  • ¿Quieres informarnos sobre un precio más bajo?

Opiniones de clientes

5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas
5 estrellas
1
4 estrellas
0
3 estrellas
0
2 estrellas
0
1 estrella
0
Ver opinión de cliente
Comparte tu opinión con otros clientes

Principales opiniones de clientes

Formato: Tapa blanda Compra verificada
El libro es bastante interesante aunque es mejor conocer un poco la historia entre Estados Unidos y Japón, que facilitará la lectura. No es muy difícil de leer, lo recomiendo para la gente que tiene un nivel de B1.
Comentario ¿Esta opinión te ha parecido útil? No Enviando comentario...
Gracias por tu opinión.
Lo sentimos, no hemos podido registrar tu voto. Vuelva a intentarlo
Informar de un abuso

Opiniones de clientes más útiles en Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 296 opiniones
4 de 4 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Powerful storytelling by first time author 20 de julio de 2013
Por Brenda H. Bricker - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
I found the way Otsuka tells this story, through the experience of each member of this family, very engaging and effective. I identified with her characters and understood that any family so banished and powerless to resist internment would feel shame as well as anguish. The experience of isolation and imprisonment without any specific knowledge about when they would again be free and what that freedom would look like, created a level of desperation we can only imagine. Around the world, the refugee experience mirrors that of Otsuka's families. We want to believe it is uncommon or rare, but it isn't. I grew up in America when Japanese Americans were restarting their lives and coming to grips with painful memories and realities of all they had lost during this dreadful time. Like most Americans, I learned about this painful history only in college. No one should wait so long when the story is so accessible and well told. No American should study history without understanding American tragedies as well as American triumphs. It is a perspective we need to understand how the world sees us and how easy it is to assume our morality is somehow better than others'.
1 de 1 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas this book will help us not ever repeat solutions like the internment of innocent Americans of any descent 5 de junio de 2016
Por Ann Brown - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
There is no doubt that the internment camps are a stain on the history of the United States. I grew up during the war in Canada, where the Japanese were transferred inland, but not interred. They became a valuable part of our community, and our friends. They were hard working and kind and gentle, but never did I hear bitterness from them, although their losses were large.
I felt the suffering of the whole family in Julie Otsuka's book about the experience of her mother,and I was made more aware of the injustices they felt. The hardest to bear seemed to be the separation from their father. Hopefully, this book will help us not ever repeat solutions like the internment of innocent Americans of any descent.
1 de 1 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Beautiful Sorrow 24 de septiembre de 2016
Por Nikki - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda Compra verificada
This was one of the most beautifully sorrowful books I've ever read. I can't even imagine what it was like for thousands of Japanese-Americans during WWII. Families who had made this their home, who were neighbors and friends, forced to leave their homes for years and never know if it would still be there when they came back. Or if they would even come back. No apologies, and things were lost that could never be given back. Vivid emotions of joy and sorrow dance across the pages of this book and an exquisite warning to not repeat the mistakes we've already made.
1 de 1 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
3.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Unemotional Reporting 3 de junio de 2015
Por Carla C. Kerr - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Tapa blanda Compra verificada
I found this author's writing to be more like a newspaper report due to the lack of emotion exhibited. This was a devastating event for the Japanese and she never gave a hint of her feelings one way or the other. She gave no one in the book names so you never quite bought into their story.
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas great but too short 7 de abril de 2014
Por Stretchkev - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Versión Kindle Compra verificada
The internment of Japanese immigrants and Japanese-American citizens during World War II is a disturbing chapter in American History, that doesn't receive much attention. Thousands of ethnic Japanese citizens and families were stripped of their freedom, homes, businesses, and sense of security overnight. Limited to what they could carry in a single suitcase, they were ushered from homes to temporary living facilities in horse stalls to their final destinations, tent cities in the harsh, remote desert regions of our country. If that wasn't shameful enough the government forced everyone to take loyalty tests, which if answered honestly could result in separation or deportation. They lost everything they had built before the war and during the war they lost their dignity. For their trouble each person was given a train ticket home and $25.00 (the same package given to convicted felons upon release) with which to start their lives over again. And yet their really isn't much written about this period.

When the Emperor was Divine is the story of one family as they struggle to prepare, adjust to live within the camp, and come home from a internment camp in the Utah desert. The story is told from the perspective of members of the family in alternating chapters. The first chapter is told from the mother's point of view as they are forced to prepare for the evacuation. The fear of the unknown and the struggle to maintain their pride is palpable. The second chapter is told by the daughter as they travel to their new home, and dealing with their loss sense of identity. The third chapter is from the young son's perspective as they adjust and learn to live within the camp. The final chapter is told from either a more mature son's perspective or a combination of both the boy and girls voices telling of a once proud father, who is now just a broken paranoid shell and a family struggling to put their life together in a world they are now very unfamiliar to the world they left.

Each chapter is unique and distinct. Normally a story told like this can be choppy, but here they flow together with no harsh transitions. This book is unrelentingly depressing and dark. The family makes the best of their situation, but they are clearly broken and they are never too far from crumbling under the stress. The only thing holding them together are their bonds. Hope is in short supply.

The only real problem with this book is that it is far too short. The four chapters only cover the first few months of the war and the aftermath for this one family. It's not enough to explore the entirity of the effects of forced relocation on the family. This book calls for a much more in depth exploration of internment. But really this is only a minor defect of a well written book, that I'm glad I was able to snipe off the wishlist.
click to open popover